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is the assistant attorney general of the civil rights division in washington, dc, he was nominated for that position by president obama and sworn in in october of 2009 and we are all the lucky -- we are all very lucky that that happened in october of 2009. tom has spent his entire career in public service and on protecting the civil rights of our most vulnerable people. tom actually joined the civil rights division as a young lawyer and while he was there he prosecuted some of the most significant cases in the country. lawyers in the civil rights division get fanned out to places in the country to handle cases in mississippi and alabama and california and all over and tom was one of those people. he was sent to texas to handle a very significant hate crime case when he was a young lawyer that involved a gang of white supremacists that went on a killing spree and ended up shooting 3 people and killing one when he was a young lawyer working in the civil rights division. he later served as a top deputy for attorney general janet reno, he was special counsel to ted kennedy and ser
looking at the civil rights laws for protection, but -- and it certainly is our job to vigorously enforce them -- but it is your job as superintendent to (inaudible) even where the federal civil rights laws don't protect you. so it's a case of taking what you are doing, what folks are doing across the country and putting those on places like stopbullying dwofl .org so we can scale those up around the country. >> recognizable face. >> (inaudible) and i'm also head of the san francisco commission on women and the lieutenant governor asked about data. actually we do have data on bullying in san francisco high schools, particularly bullying among lgbt girls. so for the first time this year we've incorporated data that kevin coggin and ilsa (inaudible) provided and their suicide rates are off the charts, lesbian girls in our district. it's actually from the cdy youth risk survey. i want to offer that as a resource to folks in this room and encourage you in this pursuit of data. >> thank you. >> my question centers around the point of view of a parent. four years ago my son shot himself at
a quick summary of the laws. the ada, calif. building code, the civil rights, and our experts here will elaborate. we also have a list of certified caps at work in san francisco for you. carla johnson with the mayor's office of disability has created a really good it died of out to interview your experts to make sure you are getting the best quality product for you. been next -- the money you pay for the inspection you can take as a tax deduction. any money that if you have taken can be applied as a tax deduction. this can be done on an annual basis. next, the opportunity, and a fund -- opportunity loan fund, providing for small businesses to pay for the inspection or to make improvements needed. to do it before you receive the lawsuit. and lastly, we of the bar association and their resources. they're providing their legal service for you. this last thing i am going to share with you in terms of what we have seen in our office is that with the individuals, that does not necessarily mean an individual will follow up with a lawsuit. what we've seen in our office is the individual's
. his actions in 2004 thrust this civil rights issue into the national spotlight and cemented his reputation as a fearless public officials who does what he thinks is right. under mayor newsom's energetic leadership the economy grew and the city became an economic center for biotech and clean tech. gach newsom has been a trail blaitzer on combating homelessness and protecting the government. in 2007 he was re-elected as mayor with more than 70 percent of the vote, which is unheard of. please welcome our lieutenant governor, gavin newsom. >> my role was to get tom to speak. i'm just going to jump in because i want to keep you all on time. you've got an agenda packet and i'm going to be held accountable if you don't meet it. roslyn, let's pick up on tom's passion. he told me a couple points that are important, that is the consciousness awareness, this growing consciousness around bullying. and it's a question i guess that requires, has bullying gotten worse or have we gotten better to begin to recognize it? >> hard to know. tom and the president refer to as far too often as
movement, the civil rights movement, and, you know, things were happening, boys and girls. harvey's election i think made people take notice. i think that george's, george's proclivities were always in and around social justice. i know that he was raised catholic. so was i. 16 years of catholic school has made me the man i am today. [laughter] >> and harvey influenced by jewish culture, you know, i don't think it's ever been explored enough. but if you talk to every brit, you know that harvey was a very, very much impacted by the holocaust. you know, if you remember, it happened in the '40s. it's only 20 years or so since he came onto the scene. and i think he was able to transfer, you know, that tragedy and that oppression into what was happening with gay people. he was very scrappy. i wanted to acknowledge two people who were very supportive of harvey milk and george moscone, and both of them have left us and that's howard wallace and hank wilson. (applause) >> what i loved about them was, what i loved about them was they knocked back a few and really get into it with harvey abo
schools are poor people. that is the height of inequality. that is what i call it a civil rights issue. those people need choices. more kids will be better educated and it will have a catalytic effect on the school system. [applause] >> the secretary of state, as a member of the cabinet, [unintelligible] >> it has been a pleasure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] the ultimate compliment. >> he made the point that ideas matter. it also matter in national security. america realized it could not win the cold war if it still had a scandalous segregation in the south. winning the civil rights battle at home was a precondition of winning the fight politically across the globe. i think looking from the outside there is the same danger now. when i go to china and i criticize them for their lack of democracy, they say but we are educating all our people. you did not do that in britain and america. when i had been in the middle east, and talk to people on the edge of radicalism, they say look at the protest in justices in your british and european and american nations.
rights, though that was part of it. for me harvey milk was about civil rights and the rights of all people and the recognition that we as minimum bier of the lgbt community are connected to other communities, and that we cannot be for lgbt rights if we're also not for the rights of other groups. that we cannot be -- (applause) >> -- only about the lgbt community. that if you believe in gay rights and lgbt rights, that you necessarily have to be for the rights of immigrants. that you necessarily have to be for the rights of women. that you necessarily have to be for the right for anyone who is disinfranchised in society. that to me is the essence of that legacy. * and why it's a legacy that transcends, transcends the lgbt community in terms whatv harvey milk was about. so, as an openly gay latino man, i am grateful for that legacy. and i am grateful that harvey milk, that george moscone, have become a beacon of light and hope not only for the lgbt community, but for so many communities throughout this country. and not just this country, but the world. and, so, that is what's so speci
community activists, civil rights activists, that looked like me, that looked like many of us. and then in the newspapers i saw two asians and they were speaking always passionately about asian american civil rights. well, they were professor ling chee wang and henry durham. and when i was actually quite despairing, i was quite despairing, it was coming down it a crucial vote in 2007 and then 2008 for the college board to support this campus, they came to the fore, they organized the community, the community rose up probably one of the first few times in the history of the chinese community in san francisco, they rose up from the ground and they said, we want this campus, we're fighting for this campus and you better vote for this campus, and guess what, we passed it and we got the campus. so this campus has been built and raised and all of us community activists, ling chee wang, all you old-timers, we built it for current generations and generations as yell yet unborn. our forefathers came hear to build the railroads. they came hear to build the railroads but really to build
will not believe this story. whether the supreme court will uphold gay marriage is a civil rights issue. those reports after these messages. >> bill: culture warrior seeing want tonight. sweden liberal country. titled to grave entitlements. on the social front anything goes. swedish version of toys r us has issued a holiday catalog that has some people perplexed pictures of little girls brandishing toy guns and little boys wielding blow dryers, perhaps practicing for the day that they too can become hairdressers. with us now to react the culture warriors jeanine pirro and gretchen carlson. carlson, you are swedish, that's your fault. >> [speaking swedish] >> bill: what does that mean. >> that's where i'm going to end with the agreement. >> bill: what did you say. >> i will make you e.d. budafes you wouldn't like it. what i said is aspeak swedish a little bit. i have been blessed to have a boy and a girl as my children. >> bill: what do you think the message of the magazine. >> instinctively boys and girls go to different toys instinctively. this is ridiculous. they should have toy magazines wi
on the issue of civil rights. to support us as councilmembers and the public to know, educate what are our rights. how you make your right to be heard. that's been a wonderful source of support. i will say to my colleagues, to the public, if you have any question about disability access in san francisco, call the mayor's office on disability. i cannot go without saying, it starts from the top. you have the mayor's office on disability. this is an administrative department, funded by the mayor. the mayor gets to check off on the budget. for the three mayors i've had the pleasure to work for, mayor brown, mayor newsom and now mayor lee, they make sure that we have the funds that we need to pursue disability access, that is vital. that is from the top. what we get to do as councilmembers, i'm trying to promote people stepping forward to apply as a council member in the future. we get to try to bridge some of the gaps that ms. jacobson herself did today. across the bay. she sees a need, she tries to bridge the gap. sometimes we need to be angry. that's okay. if we come with respec
it when we come right back ms. megyn kelly on whether the supreme court will buy gay marriage as a civil rights issue. and then a great american news quiz returns tonight. the bad parents edition. maccallum and doocy warming up maccallum and doocy warming up and we will be right having you ship my gifts couldn't be easier. well, having a ton of locations doesn't hurt. and a santa to boot! [ chuckles ] right, baby. oh, sir. that is a customer. oh...sorry about that. [ male announcer ] break from the holiday stress. fedex office. adt can help you turn on a few lights. access cameras from anywhere to help you keep an eye on things. even bring family in from the cold when you're not there. now get the advanced technology of adt starting at just $99 and save $300. with adt, you get 24/7 fast response monitoring that helps protect you from burglary, fire, and high levels of carbon monoxide. plus remote access to your home. even control your thermostat to help save energy and money. get adt installed starting at just $99. that's a $300 savings. you may even save up to 20% on your homeowners ins
and identify theft and hate crimes and civil rights issue and there's one thing that comes up in absolutely every conversation that i have had with people in the district, and that was bullying. and it really, it was, it's not surprising to the people in this room, i know. it was not surprising to me but it was troubling to me that in every community that i was meeting with, this was an issue prrp violence, harassment, physical, cyber, social, children on children, this kind of behavior is so disturbing and so troubling and so heartbreaking to so many people. even in this place, even in san francisco, california and northern california, which has got to be if not the most tolerant place in the country certainly amuck the most tolerance and diverse places in the community, this is what i was hearing out in the community and it's something we wanted to get involved in. and i'm so grateful that as a result of that all of you have agreed to come together to have a conversation about this issue with us included. i can't tell you how much we appreciate it. so thank you very much for being her
i have always been passionate about civil rights and equality for everyone, and i have a 10-year-old daughter, so having a girl has made me much more sensitive to gender equality and other issues, but i guess i have always been someone that is vocal about my politics, but as a supervisor, and having to listen to many perspectives before making key decisions. as an activist in chinatown, i have always felt that working families and people who work in our neighborhoods need to have much more support. it is always about giving more voice to immigrants or the underserved and workers in the city. that is what drives my passion as a supervisor. >> tell me about the process of running for supervisor. what did you learn from the campaign process? was anything surprising? supervisor mar: i had to move from being a regular person that barely gets his kid to school on time and makes her a healthy lunch to having to go to a photo opportunities. i was on the school board for eight years, i had some training. and i was in the democratic party central committee for years before that and was one
makers realize the real issues relate to helping support and extend the civil rights of people today. with autism, that process is still going on, but i am confident because i believe this is a civil rights issue. i believe the united states of america can guarantee the civil rights of all its citizens. thank you very much. i look forward to your questions. >> thank you mr. ne'eman. thank you to reach of the panelists. in regular order, the chair will recognize mr. burton from indiana. >> first of all, i want to thank you all very much. we talked to those people for three hours and you had to sit there. i want to tell you, i am amazed your posteriors could survive that long. the second thing i would like to say is that abraham lincoln said, let the people know the facts and the country will be saved. one of the things that we have is that i do not think there is enough information getting out to the people who are not effected. i was like that. my grandson became artistic, and then all of a sudden it became a cause for me. i was chairman at the time so i had the resources to do somet
of inequality. that is why it is a civil rights issue. those people need choices, but it will have an effect on the individual child and more kids will be better educated and it will have a catalytic effect on the system. so i would also say that as well. [applause] >> i would only add standards to that. i think it's important that we as a society, said very clear expectations for what it is. michael is a secretary of state, not in the sense that condoleezza rice was, but as a member of the cabinet there. the secretary of state and the united foundation for education. >> it has been an absolute pleasure to hear you. it is worth traveling across the united states. >> the ultimate compliment. >> the first time i have ever worried about you judging. [laughter] >> he made the point that national security, one of the reasons that america won the cold war is that they recognize it as a moral complex more than anything. and america realizes that they couldn't win these nations in particular. it was a precondition of winning across the globe. if you'll forgive me, but it's the same danger now. the e
of inequality. that's why it's called a civil rights issue. they need choices. it will have them an effect on the individual child more kids will be better educate and ting will have a effect on the -- so i would say -- [inaudible] [applause] >> i would only add standards. i think it's important as we as a society set expectations for what it is we want. the secretary of state -- not sense that cobbed lee -- condoleezza rice was the in the united nations where i got educate. i look forward to hearing from you. >> thank you. >> can i say it's been an absolute pressure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] [applause] >> the ultimate. >> to hear you spike. >> the first time i ever worried about you. >> us a tear i have -- [laughter] but you made the point that idea massive when you are changing things. they matter in national security. one of the reasons that america won the cold war, it recognized it was a moral conflict as much as nick else. an american realized they couldn't win the cold war and the -- [inaudible] in particular if it still had a scandal of segregation
: another piece of the expansion of civil rights, the subtle interaction between the supreme court and the popular opinion, the supreme court does respond to popular opinion and therefore, the four publicly embraced referenda that said we are willing -- we and our states want same-sex marriage. that affects the supreme court. >> yes. that's why -- it is an excellent point. that's why these marriage referendums that we just saw in the last election, which for the first time, gay rights advocates won -- all four marriage equality referendums the timing of that was very important because it came just before the supreme court reviewed this. obviously the court is going to look to public opinion to see whether or not the country is ready for same-sex marriage. >> eliot: it is not as though the justice of the court take polls and say 50% is for -- therefore my view of constitutional rights changes. even conservative jurists understand one's sensibility of rights changes as -- there is an evolution. >> over time, it is what
the supreme court will buy gay marriage as a civil rights issue. and then a great american news quiz returns tonight. the bad parents edition. maccallum and doocy warming up and we will be right [ male announcer ] this is joe woods' first day of work. and his new boss told him two things -- cook what you love, and save your money. joe doesn't knowt yet, but he'll work his way up from busser to waiter to chef before opening a restaurant specializing in fish and game from the great northwest. he'll start investing early, he'll find some good people to help guide him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> bill: thank for staying with us. i'm woirl in the kelly file segment tonight. three hot topics. we begin with the supreme court meeting tomorrow to consider the issue of gay marriage as a civil rights issue. you may remember that the state of california voted down gay marriage the very liberal ninth circuit of appeals ruled that the vote was unconstitutional on a civil rights basis. here now
or comparisons were exaggeration or scores or i had pershly. but after years of working as a civil rights lawyer and advocate, representing victims of racial profiling and police brutality and investigating patterns of drug law enforcement in poor communities of color and attempting to assist people who had been released from prison, re-enter into a society that had never shown much use for them in the first place, i really had a serious of experiences that began my own awakening. i began to awaken to the reality that far from ending kraft in america, we redesigned it. we create aid vast new system that has managed to relegate african americans to a permanent second-class status again. and it does function in a manner eerily reminiscent of the jim crow system. >> rose: we'll come back to the international dimension of this in a moment, but first i want to introduce this clip from the film. tell me about "the house i live in." >> "the house i live in" was a film i tried to make about the war on drugs, to go to about 25 states across the country and sort of really take stock of the whole profile o
in only the way she can. sued by civil rights groups for denying driver's licenses to undocumented immigrants who have been granted permits by the be obama administration to remain the in the united states. the deferred action program allows undocumented immigrants under 31 to avoid deportation if they arrived here before turning 16, have been in the country five straight years and are in school or have graduated from high school or a geds program or served in the military. brewer who has battled the obama administration over her state's immigration policies insists she's obeying laws. >> the state is the one that licenses the people to be able to drive on the streets. it's not the federal government. i'm not surprised i'm being sued, but that's the law and i'm going to obey my oath of office. >> it is worth noting that according to the arizona republic, the state already grants licenses to noncitizens with work permits. brewer seems to be singling out those who have received their permits through the department of homeland security's executive action. translation, jan brewer is pi
and civil rights, etc. there are rights that protect individual human beings who are maybe on the wrong side of a ma juror taryn democracy but that's very different than the minority party in the legislative body. i don't think they have to get some sort of special protections. >> they are our voice. they are the voice of the individual. >> that's what elections are for. that's what elections are for. >> and, likewise, when we talk about majority rule, we're not necessarily talking about the control by the majority party. >> right. >> it's the same principle on the other side. >> explain that. what do you mean? >> well, when we talk about the majority, for example, controlling the house of representatives, what we're talking about is the majority party. we're talking about them controlling it quite thoroughly. as long as he can keep his caucus lined up behind him, he can do essentially what he wants. we see, by the way, what happens, you mentioned the texas legislature. we see this in state legislatures in a lot of states across the country where both houses and governor belong to the same p
for civil rights. we'll tell you how japanese-americans heroically overcame their darkest hour. >> it's been called the most powerful office in the world, and you can get a chance to sit in it. >> stay with me now. some almond milk and spinach -- i promise you it's delicious. >> in "speak of the week," we'll find out just how well you know your parents. >> to go from this... to this is pretty easy if you know how. we'll get some great makeup tips from the experts at teen vogue. >> all that and more, next on "teen kids news." >> welcome to "teen kids news." i'm mwanzaa. >> and i'm livia. here's this week's top story. >> we've all heard the story of iron man. he's the comic-book superhero who chose to help mankind after suffering near-fatal injuries. nicole introduces us to iron heart, a real-life hero who's helping others after he, too, suffered near-fatal injuries. >> it was just a regular summer day, and i was crossing a local intersection on my way home from some practice, and i was struck in my driver's side door by a speeding dump truck, and the injuries were catastrophic. >> brian was 1
-abiding citizens. if he suggested stripping civil rights fromfully any other grimes large or small -- if you said black americans shouldn't be allowed to vote. you would be disciplined or fired tomorrow or later on this afternoon. it's an outrageous thinger to him to do. he's wrong that guns don't enhance safety. fbi's estimate is 750,000 times a year, 2,000 times a day law abiding citizens pull out a pistol and stop themselves from becoming a victim of crime. costas doesn't know what he's talking about. he suggested stripping me and millions of americans of our civil rights. >> there are so many things wrong with what he just said. he shouldn't be fired for expression an opinion. the idea that we live in a society that we can't express an opinion because of people's sensibility. and i never heard a rant. i just heard a person giving his opinion which i think is acceptable. bob costas has been around a long time. he's very respected. the idea that he would be fired over expressing an opinion over a tragedy is shocking. i'm not an anti-gun person. i group with guns. i group alaska. my taught for w
what they called systematic, widespread, and grave violations of civil rights. they report to torture, prison camps and public executions and urged leaders to resolve the abductions of japanese and other foreign nationals. north koreans kidnapped at least 17 japanese in the 1970s and '806s and only five returned home. the ambassador said they are a global issue. the envoy rejected the resolution and called it a fabrication based on political motivation. delegates from china and russia made it clear they rejected the conclusions of the resolution. analysts with an american satellite imagery firm have other concerns. they s a recent photo showed increase activity around a missile facility in north korea. they warn authorities could be preparing for another launch similar to the one that happened last april. digital globe released the image at the facility in the northwest. the photo was taken last friday. it shows a tents, trucks, and many fuel tanks. digital globe analysts say authorities could carry out a missile launch in the next three weeks. earlier satellite images of the facility
knowing what their civil rights are in terms of their housing. >> chair: thank you. cochair james, and program administrator -- >> i have a two-part question. one part is about the desk clerks and having someone who listen to you if you have a complaint. the complaint goes to management? they know they are trained to de escalate situation? i don't know about the training that desk clerks would have at sros. >> i think that the short answer is, that depends. a lot of nonprofit housing providers have their own training and standards to what desk clerks are trained in. yes, there are nonprofit-run sros, who have well-trained desk clerks. the vast majority are private buildings. they're not huge buildings that are very apparent. that could be 3-4 floors abouve a restaurant. that's just the person hired by the property manager, or have some sort of agreement for trade for work. and the function of that person is often to buzz people in or call 911. we are looking at raising the bar to where some of the training levels are at some of the nonprofit buildings. we have technical p
service and is lauded for his work on education, civil- rights national service, immigration, transportation, the environment, and high-tech issues. >> he is also the greatest karaoke sing their -- singer and all of congress. -- in all of congress. [applause] >> he just told me i had five minutes. what do you think of this program? [applause] it is about time. i want to thank francis and fong. i think this is the very first statewide heritage month held with the mayor of san francisco. let me say something about heritage month in san francisco and your mayor. in the old days, you remember san francisco was known for passing all of these anti- chinese ordinances to limit the movement, the productivity of chinese in the city. we know two things. change happens. maybe the state of california is the state of golden opportunities, where we have a chinese-american mayor of san francisco. 35 years ago, congress members passed similar resolutions in both house and the senate to formally recognize the first 10 days of may as asian-pacific heritage week. one year later, president jimmy
've considered and housing for broadly and civil rights more broadly. >> i will use an analogy. i was raised in the country. elephant needed to have a pen, and also a stable, you would ask someone where can i get these facilities. you certainly wouldn't expect that person to direct you to a beehive. and a beehive is where worker bees live. and a stable is where you have larger groups of people that could possibly be there. and since, you know, it's been decided that, you know, oftentimes elephants can't live in beehives, that i suggest that perhaps a beehive isn't as valuable to a city that needs an elephant pen. thank you. >> president chiu: thank you. >> i'm going to be using the overhead. this is my son. can i use the overhead? >> president chiu: sfgov-tv. august 14, 2006. i just want to sayƧ&%( [ that we talking about violence versus nudity. i'm not bringing that up. "k about my child seeing nudity, but i'm worried about them seeing guns and i'm also -- we can continue -- we continue to be ignored as mothers and fathers. every year, every day, every holiday, every birthday, we are ignor
that people make. >> we've come a long way baby, and i still remember just before the civil rights movement when racists and masog masogyists. whatever happened to content of character not color of skin, you can't criticize susan race because she's black and female, what are the rules. >> jon: and we thought we'd play it clip for you from the msnbc anchor. >> mccain tried to make her unnominatable, and would look weak. and mccain inappropriate political attack and gave us the horrible optics of he and lindsey graham as old white establishment folks wrongly and repeatedly attacking a younger black women and moments when they went strongly blue. >> jon: and claims that mccain went on a witch hunt and tarring the ambassador in the press. that's quite a loaded word. >> so many words that he can say that for some reason i can't say. next time we hear the usual suspects in the review and denouncing rush limbo, remember, they were stone cold silent most likely so far on all of this race baiting going on on the rice-mccain issue. >> jon: what about the real issues what are the real issues that the
and killed by police officer johannes mehserle on new years day back in 2009 in two oakland civil rights attorneys will argue before the ninth circuit court of appeals in san francisco that bart police officers should not receive legal immunity. last year a federal judge ruled to let the suit go forward but the officers appealed that ruling to the ninth circuit court. >>> this is day seven of a strike by clerical workers. contract talks between the workers and shippers at the ports of los angeles and long beach have resumed. the walk out by the clerk has dramatically slowed activity at the ports. dock workers are refusing to cross the picket lines. >>> oak 4:36 now. much quieter than what it was last week. let's go to tara with a first look at our traffic. >> hopefully it stays that way. we have nothing major to report. we do have flooding down in san jose area. the chp hasn't said exactly where that is. right now we will take a live look at the east shore freeway you can see the headlights there are southbound or westbound i should say as you make your way toward the mccarthur maze and
to see that we do have legal civil rights in this so- call ursociety of ours and should be recognized that way. >> reporter: attorneys for both sides say they are confident the judge will rule in their favor. but it could take a while before a decision is made. attorneys say it could be two to six months before a trial could actually happen. we'll have more on this on the ktvu news at 5:00. for now, brian flores, live in san francisco, ktvu channel 2 news. >> thank you. >>> people on woke sides of proposition 8 -- both sides of proposition 8 will have to until at least the end of the week. the supreme court took no action today on whether to review a challenge to an appeals court decision son prop 8 is if now expected to -- 8. it is now expected to take a bit. >>> we're seeing partly cloudy skies right now. as you can see in this live camera, a few stratus clouds up there. more rain storms are coming. rosemary will join us to tell us when the storm will arrive and how strong it will be. >> thank you, tori. giving you a look and some of the totals, three juicy storms and several days o
're not fighting for a civil right. i don't want gay people to be nude in public. i don't want straight people to be nude in public, not in my neighborhood and i resent very much this is an issue whether you're a prude or a homo phobe. thanks. >> thank you. next speaker. >> my name is leonard and a resident of the castro and i am happy to have an opportunity to talk to you about the what is called nudity in the cast ro. i am a supporter of nudity. i was an art student and drawing live models since i was a teenager. i go to nude beaches both gay and straight. when i have been to nude beaches with families i find it sweet and endearing. however in the castro i don't believe it's nudity. i believe it's exhibitionism and the issue is for it to function for the exhibitionists they need to cohop without the consent of other people and to me this is not unlike -- even though i believe in the live and let live and it extends too far and when you co-op other people because they specifically do not consent to be exposed to and it's unfair. and like i support people to listen to whatever music and w
home to free spirits, codify intolerance and the fact that some people are offended reduced the civil right scptsd liberties that we have here and you need to consider the slippery slope you're creating this ban. >> thank you very much. thank you for your work. next speaker. >> good morning supervisors. i am andrew thompson. born and raised in san francisco. 50 years old. i am probably older than you. >> not by much. >> okay. well, both my parents came to this country -- well, i will focus on my mother. she came with her family to escape what was happening in italy with mussolini and about the time i was born in 62 about the time that -- about the time that people were fleeing to the suburbs i asked my mother why aren't we leaving? and she said "i want my children to be raised in the city". back then i grew up in westportal. took the streetcar through the tunnel and i was going to school at seven in the morning just as the castro was winding up their evening, and saw all kinds of things that my mother may not have agreed with, but trusted in the fact that we could go throug
of presidential power to union and civil rights leader who came to office after free elections in 1990. the commission's confirm the prosecutors fears. the body was found in the wrong grade. the identity of the body in his grave has yet to be revealed, but investigators say they know who it is. in the meantime, a second burial was held in warsaw. >> the family was not present when the body was identified. mistakes are always possible. i can only express my deepest sympathy with the family. now they have to cope with the exhumation and second burial. >> he does not have a clue. he lies morning, noon, and night. we are fed up with the allies. >> for the first time in years, the civic platform is the longer the strongest party. >> a mass grave would have been better. many of the dead were beyond recognition. a symbolic of what have been better. this is a very sensitive dispute for poland. it cannot be resolved discreetly. the politicians are using it for their purposes while the families suffer. >> some say one case may have been more painful than the others because the person in the wron
better to look at your property today, have it inspected, and make the changes because this is a civil rights statute. it is the same thing as discrimination based on race, and it is treated the same way in the courts. >> i heard the previous speaker make some good points about be a pro are the -- proactive about getting a task inspector before you get sued. i am f. task inspector. if you have to cut -- heard the term thrown around, inspection created by our state senators, and it is really great information out there that i want to encourage everyone. i will not be able to go into extensive details, but i will be able to tell you a little bit of what is involved. the difference is in the california building code. i can also give you tips on how to choose and specter appeared first of all, the program has an inspector's knowledge of the california building code, and the reason why that is so important is because you have to comply with both. the california billing code is enforced when you get a building permit, and forced by the local building requirements. it says all new buildings h
this afternoon. earlier today civil rights advocates said they planned to release evidence that shows plans for a surveillance drone in alameda county. the aclu says the sheriff's office plans to use the drone for surveillance and intelligence gathering, contradicting earlier claims it would only be used for search- and-rescue operations. >>> coming up, if the feds can't reach an agreement, maybe the states can help. >> i'm danielle nottingham in washington. coming up, president obama consults a group of the nation's governors on the "fiscal cliff." >> and well wishes are pouring in for will and kate as brits make bets on whether it will be a boy, girl, twins or triplets. >>> hi, i'm meteorologist lawrence karnow live at the whole foods market in cupertino. if you have been looking for a way to help people for the holidays, we have a great idea for you plus we'll talk about that rain coming back all that in just a few minutes. ,,,,,,,,,,,,,,,, typhoon in the philippines. 33 villagers wer >>> at least 74 people are dead or missing following a powerful typhoon in the philippines. >> 33 villa
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